`

Looking for more catechesis on the Mass?

Why do we say that now? (Part 1)
This post is the first of a series that highlights the major changes to the prayers of the congregation at Mass, and compares the old and new translations with the Latin and 15 other translations (in other languages) in use around the world: Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, and Tagalog (Filipino).  It should be noted that these other languages' translations were written according to the same rule of translation as the older English translation, not the newer English translation.

"And with your spirit."
The first change we notice is that "And also with you" has become "And with your spirit." This is an accurate translation of the Latin, Et cum spiritu tuo.

Of the 15 other languages in this comparison, 12 translate the Latin as "And with your spirit".

Czech renders it as "And with you", Tagalog renders it as "And with you as well", and Portuguese has a completely different response, "He is in our midst."


"I have greatly sinned... through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault."
The new English translation of the "I Confess" (Confiteor), one of the options for the Penitential Act at the beginning of Mass, renders the Latin nimis as "greatly", and the triplet mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa as "through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault."  The old English translation omitted nimis and reduced the Latin triplet to a single line, "through my own fault."  Perhaps the use of "my own" (redundant) was meant to capture the sense of the repetition in the Latin.

There is great disparity among the other languages in their translation of these words of the Confiteor.  Some render nimis, others do not.  Some render the triplet as a couplet instead, or use a different form of emphasis, while others drop the repetition altogether.  9 of the 15 render nimis.  8 of the 15 render the triplet as a triplet, 5 as a couplet or via some other emphasis, and 2 without repetition.

Catalan, like the older English text, has "I have sinned through my fault".  Croatian, like the newer English text, has "I have sinned very much ... my sin, my sin, my great sin."  Czech has "we sin often ... it is my fault, my great fault."  Dutch has "I have sinned ... through my fault, through my fault, through my great fault."  French has "I have sinned ... yes, I have truly sinned."  German has "I have avoided good and done evil, I have sinned ... through my fault, through my fault, through my great fault."  Italian has "I have sinned much ... through my fault, my fault, my greatest fault."  Norwegian has "I have sinned greatly ... by my fault."  Polish has "I have sinned greatly ... my fault, my fault, my very great fault."  Portuguese has "I have sinned many times ... by my fault, my fault so great."  Romanian has "I have sinned very much ... by my fault, by my fault, by my very great fault."  Slovenian has "I have sinned ... I am sorry, I am very sorry."  Spanish has "I have sinned much ... through my fault, through my fault, through my great fault."  Swedish has "I have sinned ... This is my fault, my great fault."  Tagalog has "I have greatly offended ... because of my sins, my sins, my great sins."

1 comment:

Mary said...

How do I say the Confiteor in Czech?

July 24, 2016 at 2:44 PM

Post a Comment

No inappropriate language will be tolerated. Speak with charity!