`

Looking for more catechesis on the Mass?

Why do we say that now? (Part 1)
This post is the first of a series that highlights the major changes to the prayers of the congregation at Mass, and compares the old and new translations with the Latin and 15 other translations (in other languages) in use around the world: Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, and Tagalog (Filipino).  It should be noted that these other languages' translations were written according to the same rule of translation as the older English translation, not the newer English translation.

"And with your spirit."
The first change we notice is that "And also with you" has become "And with your spirit." This is an accurate translation of the Latin, Et cum spiritu tuo.

Of the 15 other languages in this comparison, 12 translate the Latin as "And with your spirit".

Czech renders it as "And with you", Tagalog renders it as "And with you as well", and Portuguese has a completely different response, "He is in our midst."


"I have greatly sinned... through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault."
The new English translation of the "I Confess" (Confiteor), one of the options for the Penitential Act at the beginning of Mass, renders the Latin nimis as "greatly", and the triplet mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa as "through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault."  The old English translation omitted nimis and reduced the Latin triplet to a single line, "through my own fault."  Perhaps the use of "my own" (redundant) was meant to capture the sense of the repetition in the Latin.

There is great disparity among the other languages in their translation of these words of the Confiteor.  Some render nimis, others do not.  Some render the triplet as a couplet instead, or use a different form of emphasis, while others drop the repetition altogether.  9 of the 15 render nimis.  8 of the 15 render the triplet as a triplet, 5 as a couplet or via some other emphasis, and 2 without repetition.

Catalan, like the older English text, has "I have sinned through my fault".  Croatian, like the newer English text, has "I have sinned very much ... my sin, my sin, my great sin."  Czech has "we sin often ... it is my fault, my great fault."  Dutch has "I have sinned ... through my fault, through my fault, through my great fault."  French has "I have sinned ... yes, I have truly sinned."  German has "I have avoided good and done evil, I have sinned ... through my fault, through my fault, through my great fault."  Italian has "I have sinned much ... through my fault, my fault, my greatest fault."  Norwegian has "I have sinned greatly ... by my fault."  Polish has "I have sinned greatly ... my fault, my fault, my very great fault."  Portuguese has "I have sinned many times ... by my fault, my fault so great."  Romanian has "I have sinned very much ... by my fault, by my fault, by my very great fault."  Slovenian has "I have sinned ... I am sorry, I am very sorry."  Spanish has "I have sinned much ... through my fault, through my fault, through my great fault."  Swedish has "I have sinned ... This is my fault, my great fault."  Tagalog has "I have greatly offended ... because of my sins, my sins, my great sins."
Table of Contents
A look at the changes in the Order of Mass in the new English translation of the Roman Missal.
Dismissal (4/4)
There are three other texts for dismissal that are new in the third edition of the Roman Missal. The bishops at the 2005 Synod on the Eucharist had proposed that, in order to “make more explicit the relationship between Eucharist and mission … new dismissal formulas be prepared … which underline the mission in the world of the faithful who have participated in the Eucharist.” Pope Benedict XVI approved this suggestion and selected three new formulas for dismissal.
The last option for the dismissal is not really new; it is the recovery of an ancient formula, “Depart in peace”, found in the late-fourth-century Apostolic Constitutions.
Go in peace. Jg 18:6; Isa 55:12; Lk 2:29; 7:50; 8:48
This recalls once more (as did several prayers during the Communion Rite) the peace that Christ gave to His Apostles on the day of His Resurrection. He gave them peace and told them that He was sending them as He had been sent by His Father. This means that the Church’s mission is the Son’s mission: to preach the Gospel, to call all men to repentance, and to lead them to salvation and eternal life.

This attitude of Christian peace is how we are sent out: “Whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace be to this house!’ And if a son of peace is there, your peace shall rest upon him; but if not, it shall return to you.” (Lk 10:5-6)
Dismissal (3/4)
There are three other texts for dismissal that are new in the third edition of the Roman Missal. The bishops at the 2005 Synod on the Eucharist had proposed that, in order to “make more explicit the relationship between Eucharist and mission … new dismissal formulas be prepared … which underline the mission in the world of the faithful who have participated in the Eucharist.” Pope Benedict XVI approved this suggestion and selected three new formulas for dismissal.
Living the Mass in our daily lives is what the second new dismissal text is about:
Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life. Lk 5:25; 1 Cor 6:20
The lay faithful exercise their baptismal priesthood primarily by sanctifying the world from within. The laity have a vocation to holiness in their everyday lives, as the Second Vatican Council made clear in its document on the lay apostolate:
They exercise the apostolate in fact by their activity directed to the evangelization and sanctification of men and to the penetrating and perfecting of the temporal order through the spirit of the Gospel. In this way, their temporal activity openly bears witness to Christ and promotes the salvation of men. Since the laity, in accordance with their state of life, live in the midst of the world and its concerns, they are called by God to exercise their apostolate in the world like leaven, with the ardor of the Spirit of Christ. (Apostolicam Actuositatem 2)
Jesus told His disciples not to do good deeds “before men in order to be seen by them.” (Mt 6:1) At the same time, He told them to let their light shine before men “that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” (Mt 5:16) These might sound contradictory: should others see our good deeds or not? The answer is that we should do our good deeds to glorify God and not worry about who sees them, so that if (and when) others see them, they too will glorify God and not us.

There is no “liturgy” in the world, at least not like there is in the Church. So we must go and live the liturgy: we must bring contrition, adoration, petition, and thanksgiving into the world. Our daily lives should be a witness to the love of God in Jesus Christ in every word and deed. This is how we can fulfill our apostolic and evangelical mission, glorifying the Lord. (Apostolicam Actuositatem 6)
Dismissal (2/4)
There are three other texts for dismissal that are new in the third edition of the Roman Missal. The bishops at the 2005 Synod on the Eucharist had proposed that, in order to “make more explicit the relationship between Eucharist and mission … new dismissal formulas be prepared … which underline the mission in the world of the faithful who have participated in the Eucharist.” Pope Benedict XVI approved this suggestion and selected three new formulas for dismissal.
The first new dismissal text gives us a clear idea of why we are being sent out:
Go and announce the Gospel of the Lord. Mk 16:15; Eph 6:19
The core of the Church’s mission is evangelization, the preaching of the Gospel for the salvation of souls. This duty belongs to all the faithful, not just to the ordained and religious. The Concluding Rites are short so that “we can get to evangelizing right away,” in the words for Fr. Tom Margevičius. “If we rush out of the church doors, it should not be because we want to beat other cars out of the parking lot, but because we can’t wait to tell others about Jesus.”

Have you ever noticed the same people in church, week after week? Have you ever wondered why no one new was showing up? Perhaps the reason is that no one has asked them to go to Mass! It does not require a professional to ask someone, “Would you like to come to Mass?” Maybe there is a person in your neighborhood who is thinking about the Catholic Church but does not know where to start; maybe you are just the one to talk to them.

The Mass itself is a good means of evangelizing, but it does not exhaust the Church’s activity. The Eucharist is the source of all the Church’s evangelical efforts, as well as their summit: everything we do to preach the Gospel flows from our communion with Christ, and this preaching leads others to full communion with Him and His Church. But between the Concluding Rites of one Mass and the Introductory Rites of the next, we should be living the reality of the Mass in the world, making Christ present by our words and deeds. Fr. Margevičius explains that Mass “call[s] us out of our busy worlds … to worship the Father through Christ in the Spirit, so that this Spirit empowers us to bring people back to the Father through Jesus Christ, whom we have encountered in the Eucharist.”

The example of the two disciples on the road to Emmaus serves us well. They had journeyed seven miles from Jerusalem to Emmaus, and the day was almost over. But they wasted no time after they recognized the Lord: “They rose that same hour and returned [seven miles] to Jerusalem; and they found the eleven… Then they told what had happened on the road, and how he was known to them in the breaking of the bread.” (Lk 24:33, 35)